Improvements for Rosebud reserve

Share

Compiled by Melissa Walsh
OWING to pressure on our space reports of the Flinders, Frankston and Hastings Councils, and other matters, are held over till our next issue.
***
MRS Charles Bowes, senior of Frankston, and Rathdown Street, North Carlton, is up and about again, after a very severe illness.
***
MR Leigh Bowes, youngest son of Mr and Mrs C. Bowes, has volunteered for active service, and is now in camp at Broadmeadows.
***
A “Tipperary” fair will be held in the Mechanics’ hall on Easter Monday (April 5th) in aid of the local Roman Catholic Church.
***
A PUBLIC meeting is convened for this (Saturday) evening, in the Frankston Mechanics Hall, for the purpose of organising a penny fund to go towards the Belgian Relief Fund. A good attendance is expected.
***
THE Minister of Agriculture (Mr Hutchinson) will open the Somerville Show on Wednesday next at one o’clock. Owing to prior engagements the Governor is unable to be present on the occasion.
***
MESSRS Brody and Mason held their fortnightly produce sale at Frankston, on Wednesday last, when a good supply of garden and dairy produce was forward, for which most satisfactory prices were realised. This market is growing in favor both with sellers and buyers.
***
ANOTHER of the old identities of the district has passed away in the person of Mr Fuller, uncle of Mrs Jacobs, of the Sunbeam Cafe, at the advanced age of 85 years.
He came here over 30 years ago from Bendigo, and took up the occupation of cab driver, (the first in Frankston).
Afterwards he carried on a bearding house in the premises now occupied by Mr Farmer, of Young Street. He left Frankston some 10 years ago, and took up his residence in Melbourne. He was buried in the Frankston cemetery on Saturday afternoon last.
***
A DARING robbery was committed in Frankston on Sunday night or the early hours of Monday morning, when the premises of Mr D. McDonald, storekeeper, of Young St, was forcibly entered by cutting a hole in the door large enough to insert a hand and turn the key, which was on the inside of the door.
About £20 worth of tobacco and cigarettes and a clock were taken, and on retiring, the robbers carefully relocked the door after them.
Up to the present no clue has been obtained as to the perpetrators of the robbery.
***
THE prize schedule of the 21st Annual Show of the Somerville Fruit growers’ Association is published on our third page, and the prizes offered are quite up to the average of former years, and the prospects seem to be bright for this year’s exhibition of fruit being one of excellent quality and quantity.
Competitors are reminded that entries close on Saturday (this evening) 6th March, but late entries will be received up to midday on Monday next, on payment of an extra shilling for each entry.
The Frankston Brass Band has been engaged for the day, which will add considerably to the pleasure of the day.
A special train leaves Flinders Street at 9.45 on the morning of show, stopping at intermediate stations, and leaving Frankston at 10.26, arriving at Somerville at 11.23. The return journey will be commenced at 6.20 p.m.
***
THE Eight Hours Committee announces elsewhere in this issue its 59th Annual Art Union, in which 100 Prizes, of a total value of £1,000 will be distributed.
The first prize is valued at £500, the second at £100 and the third at £50.
The support accorded the undertaking last year was so generous that the committee were enabled to donate a very substantial sum to the Hospitals and Public Charities, to which the proceeds are devoted.
It will be the fifty–ninth celebration of the establishment of enjoins “Eight hours’ labor, eight hours’ recreation, and eight hours’ rest.”
The Committee has already made complete arrangements in connection with the Fete, which will be held at the Exhibition Buildings, Monday, 26th April. A splendid programme of sports and amusements has been arranged for Eight Hours Day, which has been declared a Public and Bank Holiday throughout the State.
Numerous special attractions will be provided for adults and children the latter being particularly well catered, for in the shape of races for boys and girls of all ages, skipping contests, and other suitable events, and in addition, thousands of toys, skipping ropes, and bags of lollies will be given away free.
***
ROSEBUD Public Reserve.
It has been felt for some time that the growing popularity of Rosebud as a seaside resort and the need of a proper ground for holding sports meetings and other fixtures have rendered it necessary that energetic steps should be taken to improve the public reserve, which includes some 5 acres of the foreshore, and a public meeting convened by the committee of the Rosebud Land and Water Sports Club was held in the hall on Monday evening, 22nd February, to discuss the necessary means to achieve that object.
Mr W. Jones, President of the club, was voted to the chair, and Mr W. Twyford was appointed secretary.
The chairman explained the object of the meeting, and stated that a properly appointed reserve was absolutely a necessity to Rosebud.
He read an extract from the ‘Age’ of 20th inst. in which it was stated that the Minister for Lands had decided to insist upon the effective control of all public reserves.
It could hardly be claimed that the condition of the local reserve was very creditable to Rosebud, and it was therefore the duty (and he believed the desire) of all the residents to cooperate in making their reserve as attractive as possible.
He then invited the audience to give their views freely and openly as to how the object could be obtained.
A lengthy and animated discussion then took place, and Cr J. T. Brown, who represents the West Riding in the shire council, said that he was pleased to see so much interest taken in local matters, and promised to do all he could to further the laudable desires of the residents to improve their district.
***
WE regret to state that Mr F. Church is still confined to his bed with a swollen knee. It is three months since he met with an accident, and his many friends feel some anxiety at his long illness.
***
DRY weather conditions still prevail. A good soaking rain is needed to help on the late crops of fruit. The first overseas consignment of fruit for this season was despatched this week, the destination being London. Several more are to follow this month to the same place.
***
A GOOD many cases of colds and sore throats have occurred to children attending the State school lately. So far diphtheria has developed in one scholar only, who, however, has now fully recovered.
From the pages of the Mornington
Standard, 6 March, 1915.

Share