Peninsula football association open

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The friends of Cr T. Ritchie will be pleased to learn that he is able to be about again after his recent illness.   

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THE Secretary of The Frankston Football Club begs to acknowledge 10s 6d from Mr Gregory, as a donation towards the Club.

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MR R. T. Picking and family, who have resided in Frankston for some years, have removed to Glen Huntly during the winter months. The absence of the young ladies will be much felt, particularly in social and church work.

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MR W. S Price, dentist, of Bourke street, notifies that he will visit Frank- ston tomorrow (Sunday), and will be in attendance at Garrood’s Prince of Wales Hotel to receive patients. (Not St Pancras Hospital, as formerly).

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THE Sydney Music Publishing Co have secured the copyright to the popular song “She who gives her son” sung with immense success through- out Australia by Tilly Dunbar of the Fuller Vaudeville Circuit, the words being by Stephen Raffo and the music by W. Bass Hodge. Copies of the song may be obtained at Frankston, from Mrs Hays fancy goods emporium for 1s 6d per copy.

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A MEETING of the contributors to the Frankston Patriotic Fund and of the Presentation Fund Committee will be held at the Mechanics’ Institute, Frankston, on Wednesday next at 8 p.m. The principal business will be financial. The hon treasurer informs us that he has a very substantial sum in hand and it is hoped that there will be a good muster at the meeting to discuss the financial statement and the disposal of the funds in hand.   

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EMPIRE Day will be celebrated at the Frankston State School on Monday, 24th May, by the children having games etc at the school, during the afternoon, and to the evening a picture show will be given in the Mechanics’ Hall, to which the school children will be admitted on payment of 1d, and adults 6d, any surplus, after expenses are paid being given to the Belgian Fund. The picture show will commence at 7.30 p.m.

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WE call the attention of our readers to an advertisement in another column   of the formation of a Fish Club at Hastings. The club affords a privilege hitherto unattained viz, the supply of fresh fish to the members at cost price plus the cost of distribution.

The committee cannot undertake to send fish but the fish can be obtained at certain hours at Hastings after proper notice.

Full particulars can be obtained on application to Mr A. T Denham Hastings.

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AT the Mechanics’ Institute Frankston next Monday 17th May, the master magician “Linco” will present a unique up-to-date and spectacular entertainment consisting of the latest illusions and feats of slight of hand.

In these advanced days when enter-   tainments have been brought to such a “fine art”’ it is refreshing to find a performer like “Linco” who is really original to see him holding his audience one moment rocking with laughter and the next spellbound with amazement at the dexterity with which he performs one difficult feat after another undoubtedly merits him the title of the master magician.

The entertainment will also be supported by a specially selected programme of up-to-date pictures commencing at 8 p.m. sharp.

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THE latest letters from Egypt received by relatives and friends of our local soldiers reached here the beginning of this week.

One written by Driver A. G. Young was dated April 10th 1915. The troops were then at the Rest camp, a few miles out of Alexandria and they were on the move to the Dardenelles, where we have learned since, they have done such splendid work and where Aus- tralia is now living with her sons.

‘We are glad to get a move on’ the writer continues, ‘I am sure the actual fighting will be preferable to this waiting, although this camp is much better than Mena, which we left in a blinding sand storm’.

It was not long after this letter was written that the first casualty list was published, and each additional list is scanned eagerly for familiar names.

Many and genuine were the expressions of regret when the name of Mr Olley, nephew of Mrs Sherlock, of this town, was found among the list of those who were killed when the first fighting took place.

Quite a gloom was cast over Frankston on Monday, when word was received that Private R..H .Dawborn was wounded, and much sympathy is expressed for his relatives who are at present living in Melbourne after spending years in Frankston, where they are well known.

News of Ray is anxiously waited for. Corporal H C. Ashmore is also among the wounded. Up to date all other Frankston boys are still fighting for King and country, fit and well.

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MESSRS Brody and Mason request us to notify that owing to the legal matters relative to Mr McArthur’s   sale (as per preliminary advertisement) the date of this sale cannot yet be fixed.  

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AT 5.50 p.m., on the 26th of April, in an unpretentious cottage in William Street, Frankston, surrounded by sorrowing relatives, there passed silently and painlessly into the Life Eternal, one whose sojourn here had been a ministry of benefaction for many years.

To withhold our tribute from one so worthy, to fail to record appreciation of her worth, would be ill in accordance with the nature of things, for like her Divine Master it may be said of her that she went about doing good.

In all the relations of life, as daughter, wife, mother or friend, whether in pressing poverty or bravely struggling with the hardship inseparable from the lot of a pioneer, she ever exhibited a kindliness of disposition, wealth of resource, loyalty to high principle, conscience, and duty, which marked her unmistakeably as pre-eminent among women.

Grace McComb, the subject of our memoir, was born on August 19th, 1827, at Muddy Plains, near Clarence Plains, a few miles from Hobart, Tasmania.

Sixty-three years a resident of Victoria, honored and respected by all, leaving behind her six sons, two daughters, 47 grandchildren, 33 great grandchildren, she has gone to rest.

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SATURDAY last was the opening day of the Peninsula Football Association, and the weather was all that could be desired, being nice and mild, without any wind, so that it was a matter of indifference from which end the ball was kicked.

From the pages of the Mornington Standard, 15 May, 1915

First published in the Mornington News – 12 May 2015

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