The tragic death of Lord Kitchener

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A TREMENDOUS sensation, has been caused throughout the world by the news of the death by drowning of Lord Kitchener and his staff, by the founding of H.M.S. Hampshire, which occurred on Monday west of the Orkneys, while on its way to Russia, as the result of being mined or torpedoed” It is estimated that there was a total loss of 655 lives.

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THE month of May, 1916, has distinguished itself by putting up a record low temperature in Melbourne —11 degrees below zero.

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WORKING expenses on the railways have increased by £326,260 for the past quarter. The train mileage decreased by 154 575.

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IN our report of the Somerville District Help Society, appearing last week, the name of Miss Barber was inadvertently omitted from the committee.

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NEWS was received yesterday by his father that Private E. Reynolds, of Frankston, has been slightly wounded. Further information is anxiously awaited.

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ON Sunday, 28th ult., the Rev G. A. Kitchen was inducted into the charge of St Paul’s, Hay, by the Bishop of Riverina. Mr Kitchen has been appointed Canon Residentiary of St Paul’s Pro-Cathedral.

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THE “Wattles” Club will hold a social in the Frankston Mechanics’ on Saturday next; (June 17th) in aid of the Langwarrin Camp Amusement Hall. As this Club has established a name for itself in providing a pleasant evening’s entertainment, there will doubtless be a large attendance.

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LADY Stanley has circularised the different branches of the Red Cross League, notifying that the appeal has now closed, but at the same time trusts that the branch Red Cross Societies will continue their labors, as large demands in kind continue to be made on the Central Red Cross Society, and it appears certain that the activities of our troops at the front will increase greatly in the immediate future, with a consequent increase in the demand for supplies of a Red Cross nature, both here and abroad.

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THE annual meeting of subscribers to the Ragged Boys’ Home was held at the institute, Exhibition street, on Wednesday night, the president, Mr W. Woodhead, being in the chair. It was stated in the annual report, which was read by Mr W. Minton, that a large number of “ old boys “ had volunteered for the front. During the past year 84 boys were sheltered at the institute, 38,524 free meals were distributed, and 10,988 free beds were provided. Financially, the year was a very satisfactory one, the debit balance which existed at the opening was converted into a credit balance of £84. The receipts amounted to £1731, and the expenditure to £1647.

  The election of officers resulted :— President, Mr W. Woodhead (re elected) ; vice-presidents, Messrs J. Menzies, M.L.A, and G. H. G. Wharington ; new members of committee. Major E. T. Apps and Messrs W. Day and A. Smith; treasurer, Rev. S. M. Solomon (re elected) ; auditor, Mr. F. G. Wood, J P., (re-elected) ; patrons, Mr W. H. Lawson M.L.A., Captain Tickell and Mr A. Bastow.

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THE Rev. A. P. McFarlane was inducted to the parish of St. Paul’s, Frankston, on Saturday evening, of June 3rd, 1916, at 7.30 o’clock, by the Rev..M.A., Warden of St Kilda East. Canon Hart a so preached a fine and appropriate sermon for the occasion. He exhorted the congregation to receive their parish priest as the gift of Jesus Christ to His Church and to them. Christians are called to be Saints and Christ wants them to work as preachers of God for the extension of His Kingdom.

  The preacher went on to say that there was a mistaken idea in the minds of many that they, as Christians had nothing to do except attend the services whenever they felt inclined.

  The true idea of Christian life was that each person who was baptised into the Body of Christ, which is His Church, was a priest to the church and they had to spread the word. There was a large congregation.

  The visitors from Melbourne returned by the 10.23 p.m. train and said good-bye to Mrs McFarlane and the Vicar at the station singing “Auld Lang Syne ‘’and “They are jolly good fellows.”

  On Sunday, June 4th, the vicar celebrated Holy Communion at 11 a.m., when there was a large congregation and the persons made their communion.

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TREATMENT of Carriers of Meningitis Cases. A satisfactory method of clearing the nose and throat of (whistle) organisms is by means of a nasal douche, made as follows:

  Dissolve one teaspoonful each of table salt, baking soda, and boric acid in a quart of hot water. Apply the fluid by means of a special nasal syphon douche or, if not at hand-a learned medico’s substitute-form the hand into a cup and snuffle the fluid up the nose, and allow it to run out of the mouth.

  With the above following inhalant should be used by the inhaler, using five drops at a time : Eucalyptus oil, .8 parts; Terebene, 2 parts; Menthol, 1 part. A minute or so at a time at frequent intervals during the day.

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THE most ambitious and extensive enterprise in peanut growing yet made in Australia was in the Frankston district during the past year. On three types of soil, on a mixture of clay and sand, a sandy loam, and on almost pure sand in which bracken luxuriates, Mr C. Evelyn Liardet planted 58 acres. Frankston is by the sea, and has an average annual rain fall of upwards of 30 inches.

  Mr Liardet was courageous in making so considerable an experiment; but he had the confidence of experience. Although born in Australia, he spent many years in North China associated with large peanut oil manufacturing works. He studied the plant and its habits and observed that it prospered in temperate portions of the Chinese Empire.

  Last year he imported a large supply of seed from the Shantung province. It is a different variety from that previously tried in Victoria, having the recumbent habit as against the up- right. The sandy land was ploughed three or four times, and was harrowed as often. Beginning in November, and running through December and into January, the seed was planted by hand in rows a foot apart, with distances of a foot within each row.

  Mr Liardet now possesses local grown seeds of this interesting variety, and he is evidencing confidence in having decided plant out another considerable area in the next summer.   

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From the pages of the Mornington Standard, 10 June, 1916

First published in the Mornington News – 7 June 2016

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