Browsing: Local History

OBITUARY Leslie John Martyn 26 January 1932 – 31 August 2021 Well known sporting identity and businessman Les Martyn died at Cabrini Hospital on 31 August after a long illness. He was a much-loved husband of Denise (deceased) and father/father-in-law of Stuart & Carolyn, Paul & Angela, and Graeme & Angela. Les was a grandfather of Emily, Catherine, Georgina, Matthew, Jack and Grace. Because of existing restrictions, attendance at the funeral service, held on 9 September, was limited to family members. The eulogy was given by Les’ sons Stuart, Paul and Graeme and this obituary is based on their comments. …

WELLWISHERS filled Baden Powell Park Scout Hall last month to mark the passing of Mount Eliza resident John Scholes. The dedicated civil engineer and environmentalist was remembered by wife Ann as a “gentle man of measured words, deep-thought and boundless practical skills”. Theirs was a life of family, Scouting, travel and care for the environment – all things dear to Mr Scholes’ heart. The couple met at RMIT in 1968 where he was studying chemical engineering and married at St James the Less Church, Mount Eliza, on the day of Gough Whitlam’s election in 1972. Their wedding breakfast was held…

A DOYEN of Melbourne’s food scene, Hermann Schneider, who died on 6 May aged 86, of lymphoma, had long-standing links to the Mornington Peninsula. He was a partner at Delgany Country House Hotel, Portsea, 1987-1994, and ran the restaurant at Arthurs Seat from 1994, which closed when structural problems forced the chairlift to close in 2003. Schneider came to Melbourne in 1956 aged 20 as a chef for the Swiss team at the Melbourne Olympics. He stayed on, met and married Faye, and they opened Two Faces restaurant in South Yarra in 1960. Faye died in 2007. His funeral was…

BORN and bred French Island resident Rose Scott has done it again. The 90-year-old was delighted to cut the ribbon to open the island’s new Coast Road bridge, Saturday 24 April, after opening the first bridge on almost the same spot near Tankerton Road about 30 years ago. Afterwards she enjoyed a glass of champagne. French Island Community Association president Noel Thompson said about 60 well-wishers turned up to watch Ms Scott do the honours and eat lunch afterwards. Ms Scott – nee Thompson – who usually lives on Coast Road, came across by barge as she is living with…

MICHAEL and Noelle Woolf, who celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary on 8 April, met and were married at St Mark’s Anglican Church, East Brighton. The couple met at the church and regularly played tennis there but, before their relationship became official, Noelle left for an 11-month working holiday based in Toronto. She made the trip to and from Canada aboard the Orsova and was waved off and greeted by Michael, although she says that initially there was no romantic interest. They say their strong faith has sustained them throughout the years and they have always done things together. The Woolfs…

ONE of Rye’s most dynamic citizens was farewelled at a memorial service attended by 250-300 family and friends at three sites, Tuesday 19 January. The service was held at St Andrews Anglican Church, and live-streamed into the church hall, as well as to Rye Primary School hall across the road. Another 80 people viewed the service online from home. There was much to celebrate in the life of Pauline Powell OAM, pictured, who was described by well-wishers as a “stalwart of the community”. Ms Powell, who died aged 88, was born at Murrumbeena in 1933. She trained as a pharmacist…

THE first superintendent of Mount Martha Golf Course, and a man who took the far-sighted step of initiating professional connections with China in the 1980s, has died. Rob Boundy, married to Heather for 50 years, died in November after a long illness. Appointed superintendent of the fledgling course in 1977, Mr Boundy moved the family with two daughters and a son from Balwyn to live in the “residence”: a timber house moved from Barkly Street. In setting up the Mount Martha course he worked to a design by Colin McKenzie, who was responsible for the Cape Schanck and later Nepean…

A WOMAN who has been a part of Melbourne’s growth and prosperity for more than 100 years celebrated her 108th birthday last week. Marjorie Andrew, a resident at Benton’s Lodge, Mornington, was born at Moonee Ponds on 15 January 1913. Speaking to The News last week she said: “I grew up in Mordialloc, attended Mordialloc Primary School and finished my Leaving Certificate at night school. “My first job was as a clerk with the State Electricity Commission, first in Flinders Street and then Cheltenham.” After marrying Cyril “Bruce” Andrew at Mordialloc’s St Nicholas Church in May 1939, Ms Andrew faced…

LESS than six months before the official end of World War II headlines were made in Melbourne when thieves fatally fell out during a robbery at Mount Martha. The “mastermind” behind the robbery at the Maryport guest house in Lempriere Avenue, 18-year-old Kevin Albert Joiner, had outlined his plan to his two accomplices during an afternoon meeting in a Burke Street cafe. On 17 April 1945 – the war ended on 2 September – Joiner recruited Thomas Charles Clarke, 29, a soldier, and a 14-year-old youth (identified only as “Harris”, to rob his previous employers, James Eric Dowdle and family.…

OBITUARY Margaret Jacqueline Crittenden 18 October 1942 – 26 November 2020 WELL known Mornington Peninsula vigneron and restaurateur Margaret Crittenden died at George Vowell Aged Care facility on Thursday, 26 November. She was 78. Her funeral service was held at Tobin Brothers, Mt. Martha, on Friday, 4 December. Her husband, Garry, compiled the eulogy on which this obituary is based. *** Marg, as she was generally known, was an only child, born at St Andrew’s Presbyterian Hospital, East Melbourne, to Jack and Marion Down, on 18 October 1942. Jack, a trained accountant, originally from Warrnambool, met Marion in the…

By Jake Pike THE death of a family member or friend is never easy. COVID restrictions have highlighted the pain caused when those closest are not afforded closure around the death of a loved one. But this pain and uncertainty is not an unprecedented pandemic phenomenon, it’s a feeling all too familiar for the friends and family of the women found in Tynong North and Frankston between 1980 and 1983. Despite the six-million-dollar reward and multiple investigations, the murders of Catherine Headland, Bertha Miller, Allison Rooke, Joy Summers, Narumol Stephenson and Ann-Marie Sargent have gone unsolved for forty years. While…

ARMY veteran Alan Moore and his friends at Corowa Court, Mornington, are gearing up to celebrate his centenary on Friday 20 November. It’s an occasion to be cherished by this genial contributor who notched up a solid record of service during WWII, as a long-term Frankston Rotarian, as 2019 Victorian senior of the year as well as receiving awards for 40 years of volunteer service at the Anglicare Mount Eliza Op Shop. Born and raised in Camberwell, Mr Moore was in his final year at school when war was declared in 1939. After working at odd jobs, he enlisted and…

AN appeal has gone out in a bid to find enough “Moorooduc stone” to help restore an open air chapel at Shoreham. The chapel in Buxton Reserve off Marine Parade was built in 1951 and named after Cyril Young who along with his younger brother Ivan was a member and leader of the YMCA. The brothers died in World War II, and the chapel was dedicated to Cyril and the pulpit to Ivan. The YMCA’s Camp Buxton was established in 1925. However, the chapel has deteriorated in recent years and now the Cyril Young Memorial Chapel Association needs Moorooduc stone…

FRANK Brown and cycling go back a long way. The 90-year-old, of Hastings, is a member of the Spice cycling group at Balnarring and enjoys his weekly 40 kilometre Saturday ride with the group of mates he befriended in 1983. Last Saturday they held a “birthday ride” for their friend who celebrated his milestone birthday on 18 October. Mr Brown says he can “usually” keep up with the younger members but admits to finding the hills a “bit of a challenge”. During the week and depending on the weather he may go out for a solo ride on his carbon…

INSTEAD of celebrating her 100th birthday in isolation, a much-loved Balnarring great-great-grandmother – born in 1920 – was able to mark the occasion at home. Muriel Bettes accepted best wishes from family and friends at her front door, by phone, or – for a select few, due to the restrictions – inside her Balnarring home. Ms Bettes, a patient of Peninsula Health’s Hospital in the Home Unit, said: “To be able to enjoy the day with those who I love the most, simply meant the world to me. “Even though glass separated me from many of those who dropped by,…

NOT too many weddings get interrupted by an air raid, but that’s happened when British couple Frank and Rena O’Neil, pictured, tied the knot during the darkest days of World War II. “We had just finished our wedding vows when there was an air raid and we all ran for cover,” Mr O’Neil said. “There were huge rations at the time so we didn’t have any champagne, wine or cake to celebrate with.” The October 1942 wedding – when Rena was 19 and Frank 21 – came after they met while playing in the street as teenagers. They celebrated their…

HMAS Cerberus – the Royal Australian Navy’s oldest commissioned base – has celebrated its centenary. Known as the “cradle of the navy”, the 15 square kilometre base at Crib Point faces Hanns Inlet, between Sandy Point and Stony Point in Western Port, was bought in 1911 and formally commissioned as Flinders Naval Base on 1 September 1920. To commemorate the milestone, Commanding Officer Captain Mike Oborn and his senior leadership team this month unveiled a centenary plinth at the site of its original commissioning. Cerberus provides training for recruits from all three branches of the Australian Defence Force. About 1800…

HASTINGS police laid a wreath at the cenotaph at Hastings commemorating the war service of veterans representing US Army Small Ships, Saturday 15 August. The small service performed by Acting Sergeant David Kennedy and Constable Kip Mulvogue on the 75th anniversary of VP Day – Victory in the Pacific – referred to Japan’s acceptance of the Allied demand for unconditional surrender made on 14 August 1945. For Australians, it meant World War II was finally over. COVID-19 restrictions prevented a larger ceremony, but the wreath-laying went some way towards honouring the memories of the 3328 Australians, including one woman, who…

AGE offers insight and understanding; it provides a well-rounded perspective on life’s events often overlooked by a youth-focused society. The benefits of longevity certainly haven’t been lost on Mornington 107-year-old Thelma Kirkman, who can look back on her experiences during the momentous events of the early-to-mid-20th century: World War I, the gay 1920s, Great Depression and the foreboding and horror of World War II. More relevant to today’s events, she can remember seeing people “dying on the streets” during the 1918-20 Spanish flu epidemic, which infected 500 million people – about a third of the world’s population at the time…

FORMER Petty Officer Douglas Alfred Symes enjoyed a tour of the Victorian Maritime Centre’s museum on the Esplanade, Crib Point, before the coronavirus lockdown. “Dougie”, as he is known around the Crib Point RSL, spent time viewing the exhibition and has vowed to return. During a lunch in his honour the 94-year-old entertained the centre’s volunteers by relaying highlights of his 48 years’ service in the Royal Australian Navy after entering HMAS Cerberus as a recruit in 1943. A quote from a citation presented to Mr Symes by the Commanding Officer of HMAS Cerberus at the time stated: “Your dedication,…

A MORNINGTON woman described by her daughter as “four foot 10 inches of positivity and happiness” toasted her centenary on Friday 3 July. But, due to coronavirus concerns, Elaine Hedgcock’s birthday was a trifle muted. “Unfortunately we couldn’t all be there, however, her four children, three of her 14 grandchildren, and four or her 27 great-grandchildren came separately during the day in rosters,” daughter Robyn Davies said. She also has two great-great grandchildren. “There were lots of phone calls and three overseas FaceTimes from grandchildren – Tim from Perth, Lara from San Francisco and Peter from Dubai.  They were very…

HISTORY buff Margaret Howden is waiting to hear back from Heritage Victoria about saving a Mornington shop front from demolition. Ms Howden said the “gorgeous” old hardwood frontage at 27 Main Street was due to be pulled down and replaced as part of a redevelopment. She said the builder was amenable to her plans to preserve the facade if she can have it removed. “I have got friends of friends finding a builder to do the removal and a truck to take it away,” she said. Ms Howden said she had contacted Cr Bev Colomb who discovered that other shop…

IT’S doubtful if anyone’s centenary has been more grandly celebrated – or its recognition more justly deserved – than that given to Capel Sound resident William Lumley AM, who turned 100 last week. By any account Mr Lumley has led a life of outstanding service to the community. He was the first president of the National Pharmacy Students Association of Australia, Chelsea councillor and mayor, Justice of the Peace, inspection pharmacist for the Commonwealth Department of Health, board member and president of the Chelsea Bush Nursing Hospital for 31 years, as well as being on school, lifesaving and community boards…

THE Quarantine Station at Point Nepean played a vital role in keeping early Victorians well away from those carrying disease, with a period of intense activity to shield the colony from the Spanish Flu in 1919. Twelve timber “influenza huts” were built to quarantine overseas arrivals in what remains – even during the scourge of COVID-19 – the world’s most deadly pandemic. Topical as that scenario is today, there are no current plans to use it as an isolation station. A visit to the Quarantine Station (when it reopens) will once again offer those interested in history an opportunity to…

AN “iconic” Mornington couple who have contributed to their community over the past 50 years will celebrate their 60th anniversary on Thursday 23 April. Noel and Pauline Scott were planning a big lunch but, as dictated by COVID-19, it will be a quiet affair. “They have had to cancel,” daughter Julie Oldenburger said. “They are 81 and 83 and so are in the highest risk category.” The couple met at Albury when they were children and married at that city’s St Patrick’s Church, 23 April 1960. Mr Scott was in the Australian Army for 35 years, beginning as a 16-year-old…

A STUDY of the wreck of a small Australian-built ship off Rye has helped Flinders University maritime archaeology students reveal more of the history of early timber vessels in Victoria. The students from South Australia partnered with Heritage Victoria and the community-based Maritime Archaeology Association of Victoria to investigate the wreck of the Barbara sunk near the pier in 1853. The ship was built along the Tamar River in Tasmania by Joseph Hind in 1841 and operated as a lime trader in Port Phillip. The making of lime and its shipment to Melbourne for brickmaking was one of the southern…

LITTLE did the judge know when sentencing a 19-year-old farm labourer to spend years in Britain’s Van Dieman’s land penal colony that his actions would have a profound effect on as yet unnamed town of Portsea. James Sandle Ford was transported to what was to become Tasmania aboard the Eliza in 1831, a convicted fellon because of his role in an uprising of agricultural workers. After being granted a free pardon in 1836, Ford went to Sydney in 1838, marrying Helen Sullivan in 1841. The Sullivan family had emigrated from Ireland two years earlier hoping to find employment in the…

A MEMORIAL “pilgrimage” conducted at Queenscliff last week has special relevance to families living on the Mornington Peninsula. It marked the date 60 years ago when three young Army commandoes lost their lives in a training exercise while crossing The Rip, 17 February 1960. A ceremony marking the tragedy was held at Shortlands Bluff, Sunday 16 February. Soldiers involved in the exercise still living on the Mornington Peninsula are Bob Dunball, Dave Gilder, Leigh Power, Wil Vicum and Winston Trood. A keen historian – and skipper of an army vessel involved in the disaster – Mr Trood said on that…

MORNINGTON Peninsula Shire councillor Hugh Fraser has added to the national debate over Australia Day being 26 January by pointing out the date’s significance to Sorrento. In his Australia Day address Cr Fraser noted that the first European settlement in Victoria, at Sorrento, was abandoned on 26 January 1804, just four months after in was established. Cr Fraser said Lt Governor David Collins arrived at Sorrento in October 1803, with two ships, officers, marines, convicts, free settlers, a public service and a printing press to print his general orders and garrison orders. “I think the really important point is that…

OBITUARY Barry William Leslie Ross 30/1/1943-7/12/2019 Banker, surfer, conservationist BARRY Ross played a major role in the protection of green wedges in Melbourne’s southeast including Frankston and the Mornington Peninsula for almost two decades. He was a conservationist for more than 40 years. As long-time secretary of Defenders of the South East Green Wedge, part of the Green Wedges Coalition, Mr Ross was the bane of many a developer. Mr Ross, who died in his sleep on Saturday 7 December aged 76 after a long battle with oesophageal cancer, provided a sharp edge to the Defenders in the state’s planning…